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  • A unique snap-strap system developed by ExOfficio for its series of convertible pants. PackStraps are attached to the back of convertible pants for the purpose of stowing the zip-off extensions. Travelers have also found multiple other uses for Packstraps, like securing jackets and gloves when not in use.
  • PacLite® is the lightest, most packable material available from Gore-Tex®. PacLite® garments are manufactured with high-performance polyester or nylon fabric. A protective layer with an oil-phobic substance is combined with a waterproof Gore-Tex® membrane to eliminate the need for a separate lining, thus making this one of the lightest waterproof, windproof and breathable materials on the market.
  • Sierra Designs’ patented device for securing a sleeping bag to its pad, preventing it from sliding off onto cold surfaces during the night. PadLocks are compatible with any sleeping bag that has attachment loops. Easy to install, PadLocks can help you get a good night’s sleep in the wilderness.
  • A non-pilling polyester combined with Lycra® for stretch and recovery. Used in home décor applications, paragon fabric has a durable, lasting finish that pays back the investment in draperies and chair coverings. Available in many beautiful patterns, paragon fabric is an interior decorator’s dream.
  • A hip-length outer garment with hood and drawcord. The parka originated in Alaska and was traditionally designed with fur trim for arctic environments. Usually insulated with down, acrylic fibers or modern synthetics, today’s parkas are engineered to resist wind, rain and snow, which is why parkas are often favored by skiers, alpinists and hunters.
  • A patch pocket is an unfitted, flat pocket sewn to the exterior side of a garment, such as on the front of a shirt or the backside of blue jeans. Patch pockets are low-profile and ideal for holding small items, such as a slim wallet or pocket watch.
  • Patent leather is coated or varnished leather that has been given a glossy, lustrous finish. While typically black, patent leather can come in a variety of colors, all of which have the same characteristic glossy surface. Patent leather is commonly found on formal footwear, accessories and women’s handbags.
  • Originally designed for formal, double-breasted jackets known as tail coats or morning jackets. Although not limited to double-breasted suit styles, peak lapels are nevertheless considered a special-occasion detail that only the most trendy of modern dressers can pull off in a conservative, everyday business suit.
  • Percale is a closely woven plain-weave fabric, most frequently made from cotton. Used in sheeting, bedding and clothing, percale has a thread count of 200 or higher, a smooth, linen-like finish and medium weight.
  • A fine Tactel® nylon fabric developed by Columbia Sportswear. Basic Perfecta Cloth is engineered to be lightweight, quick drying and water repellent. Perfecta Cloth is ideal for outdoor activities like hiking and backpacking, and is also excellent for activities in or around the water, such as canoeing or boating. Perfecta Plus II offers additional sun protection.
  • Pertex® is a versatile, highly breathable, wind-resistant, fast-drying, durable, lightweight and moisture-wicking fabric that is typically found in down jackets and sleeping bags. Pertex® uses capillary action technology to move moisture from the body and offers excellent weather protection without the need for heavy exterior coatings.
  • Pertex Quantum® is the lightest Pertex® fabric ever made and is ideal for situations where high water resistance isn't as important as breathability or weight savings. Pertex Quantum® has an exceptionally high strength-to-weight ratio. It is also down proof and commonly used for high-end sleeping bags, down jackets and expedition gear.
  • A type of cotton grown in Peru under meticulous growing conditions. Often considered “the cashmere of cotton,” Peruvian cotton is a long-staple fiber with an exceptionally soft, almost silky hand. Peruvian cotton is hand-harvested to remove impurities and produce a more brilliant shade of white that possesses a marvelous affinity for dye.
  • Also referred to as photochromatic lenses, photochromic lenses are engineered to darken when exposed to sunlight. They gradually return to their clear state when sunlight is removed. While photochromic lenses eliminate the need for a second pair of prescription sunglasses, they may not fully darken inside tinted vehicles.
  • A neatly patterned weave with single filling threads in different colors. One example of pick and pick fabric is sharkskin, a smooth suiting fabric that has alternating picks in black and white. Up close, sharkskin’s pick and pick texture looks like small zig-zagging lines, but from a distance it looks more like a textured grey charcoal.
  • The mark of a better quality suit, pick stitching conveys craftsmanship and the bespoke standards that once characterized old-fashioned tailoring methods. Visible around the lapels and edges of a jacket, pick stitching is done by hand with a needle and thread, leaving cloth spaces between the stitches. Sometimes pick stitching is executed using a shorter stitch on top and a longer one underneath.
  • When a fabric is dyed after it has been woven; the same as Fabric Dyed. The opposite of yarn dyed.
  • A process that produces a worn or used appearance in a fabric. As opposed to the regular dying process, pigment dying uses ground pigments that actually adhere to the outside of a fabric rather than fully penetrating it. There are some cases in which a pigment-dyed fabric requires an outer coating of resin to help the substance bond with the fabric.
  • A durable leather with a naturally pebbled grain made from pigs or hog. Used in clothing, shoes, baseball gloves and footballs, pigskin is considered as robust as cowhide and it is sometimes difficult to tell the difference between the two. If pigskin and cowhide leathers are treated identically, they should possess the same strength, softness and flexibility.
  • The raised surface or “nap” of a fabric. Pile can possess various degrees of plushness and depth, depending on the desired effect. A pile or nap is created by running cut or uncut fibers over metal rods or wires that change the texture of the yarn filaments. Types of pile include velvet, corduroy, chenille, terry cloth and faux fur.
  • The formation of small, fibrous balls that detract from the appearance of a fabric. Pilling is typically caused by friction on a fabric’s surface, which loosens them from the weave and tangles them into fuzzy balls. Some fabrics like angora are more prone to pilling because of the short loose fibers that react to friction.
  • Also known as extra-long staple (ELS), Pima is a premium quality cotton that yields a high thread count, allowing for dense, soft and supple fabric. Primarily grow in Peru and the southwestern United States, Pima cotton is recognized for its superior softness, moisture absorbency, luster and durability over conventional cottons.
  • Pin check is a vertical and horizontal design pattern achieved by crossing pin-sized stripes (usually one yarn thickness) in contrasting colors. The result is a dot-like, textured effect.
  • Commonly used to manufacture dress shirts, blouses, bed sheets and linens, pinpoint fabric has a woven basketweave structure and a soft, fine texture. Its lightweight feel and soft hand make pinpoint fabric popular for use in both men’s and women’s dress shirts.
  • Pinstripes are a pattern of very thin, parallel stripes that generally run vertically on suits and other garments. Pinstripe patterns are commonly found on formal business attire and high-end fashion apparel. However, any type of fabric can have pinstripes, including athletic apparel.
  • Also known as pincord or needlecord, pinwale is textured fabric with fine, narrow wales, such as the vertical rows of ridges found on corduroy. The width of wale cords is measured by the count of cords per inch. The finest type of cord, pinwale is above 16 cords per inch, yielding a hand as soft as velveteen.
  • Piping is a narrow fold or tube of fabric used to create either a corded outline or to trim pockets. Piping is often used to finish a seam cleanly, as well as for contrasting detail. Piping detail is popular on western apparel.
  • Pique is a knitting method that creates a fine-textured mesh face that bears an appearance similar to waffle weave. Commonly used in the manufacture of polo shirts, this fabric construction is designed to pull moisture away from skin, and its tiny holes promote breathability.
  • A supplier of high-performance leather for gloves, shoes, luxury leather goods and sports equipment. Pittards® leather has a thin but tough structure that undergoes a special tanning process to renders it more resistant to water and sweat. Highly breathable and abrasion resistant, Pittards® leather is also remarkably supple, making it the ideal choice for applications like cycling gloves, where it is applied to enhance grip.
  • Marmot’s PitZips are underarm ventilation panels with zip closures, extending from the sleeve into the body to maximize breathability and effectively release excess heat during periods of activity. Jackets with PitZips are often preferred by skiers and snowboarders to help regulate body temperature and prevent overheating.
  • A placket is a separate strip of fabric sewn on the edge of a sleeve, collar, and shirt front that reinforces and gives a structured appearance. Unlike a French front shirt, where the shirt front is simply edge stitched, a placket comprises an extra strip of fabric through which buttonholes are sewn.
  • A pleat is a fold of fabric that is made by doubling the material over itself. The pleat is a traditional tailoring technique created to add volume, dimension or decoration to a specific area of the garment. There are many different kinds of pleats including accordion plats, box pleats and knife pleats.
  • A pleated curtain waistband is characterized by folds of fabric inside the waistband of a trouser. It is designed to “grab” the shirt, preventing it from migrating out of the waistband throughout the day. The pleated curtain waistband is an extra detail that is found only in the highest quality trousers because of the time and extra fabric it takes to create.
  • The term “ply” refers to the number of fibers twisted together to form a yarn. Higher ply yarns produce a stronger fabric with more stitch definition. Two-ply yarns are the preferred choice for shirting fabrics.
  • A pocket is a piece of fabric integrated into a garment that is used to carry smaller items, warm the hands or create a simple adornment. Pockets may be open or secured with a button, zipper, snap or touch-fasten tab. There are several different style of pocket styles, including slash pocket, side seam pocket, and scoop pocket.
  • A point collar is a shirt collar that comes down to a point on each side and has less distance between the points than a moderate spread collar or a spread collar. The point collar works especially well with people whose faces sport a slightly wider countenance than average.
  • Pointelle is a feminine, delicate-looking pattern that adds texture and interest to rib-knit fabrics. Pointelle stitches can take the form of chevrons, geometric shapes or floral themes and can be intermittent design elements or comprise an entire garment, as in pointelle underwear.
  • Polar fleece is a type of fabric with a deep, soft pile. As an insulating garment or insulating layer, polar fleece is commonly made of polyester in various weights and often specially used in combination with other fabrics or membranes. “Fleece” is also an apparel industry term designating sweatshirts and sweatpants.
  • Polarfleece® is the original polyester fleece material developed by Polartec®, which is still in use. Polarfleece® is often used in blankets because of its exceptional softness, warmth and light weight. It is also used in outerwear and cold-weather gear because it keeps the wearer warm without overheating.
  • Polarguard® is a continuous filament, polyester synthetic fiber used in insulating materials, primarily sleeping bags and outerwear. Polarguard® retains most of its loft and insulating properties when wet. It is non-allergenic, does not mildew and articles made with it are washable. It has several different types of insulating fibers, listed below.
  • Polarguard® 3D is a continuous filament, polyester synthetic fiber used in insulating materials, primarily sleeping bags and outerwear. It retains most of its loft and insulating properties when wet. It is non-allergenic, does not mildew and articles made with it are washable. Polarguard® 3D is a softer fiber that is similar to down in its properties, and is the type most commonly used in sleeping bags and outerwear.
  • Polarguard® HV is a continuous filament, polyester synthetic fiber used in insulating materials, primarily sleeping bags and outerwear. It retains most of its loft and insulating properties when wet. It is non-allergenic, does not mildew and articles made with it are washable. Polarguard® HV is 25% lighter than the original type and is more compressible for backpacking and expedition uses.
  • Polarized lenses are typically created by applying a polarizing film to the outside surface of the lens. The polarized film is usually protected by an anti-scratch coating. Some high-end sunglasses embed a polarized film within the lens itself. Polarization helps reduce reflected glare from the surface of water, snow, roads and other surfaces. Polarized lenses are also believed to reduce eye fatigue.
  • Polartec® consists of several types of superior-grade polyester fleece used as an insulating garment or layer attached to other fabrics, such as a shell. Polartec® is produced in many weights and finishes, and may be treated or blended with other materials for wind and water resistance, stretch and other properties.
  • PolePilot is an unbroken sleeve for tent poles that allows for easy setup. The PolePilot, made by Easton, helps tent poles slide into places more easily, which makes setup and take-down quicker. The sleeves also make it easier for a single person to set up the tent.
  • Polycarbonate is a thermoplastic characterized by light weight, high-impact strength and flexibility. Polycarbonate is shatter-resistant and resists electricity, so it is often used in products made to withstand heavy usage or electrical charges. Some examples of its uses include: sunglass/eyeglass lenses, electronic casings, CDs and DVDs, and containers used for camping, hydration and storage.
  • Polyester is a man-made fiber that is second only to cotton in worldwide use. Polyester is strong; resists wrinkling, stretching and shrinking; and has high resistance to abrasion. It dries quickly, is one of the most popular wicking fabrics and is woven with many other fabrics to add strength and durability.
  • Polyfill is a polyester fiber used primarily as insulation, but also as a base for quilting. Polyfill is often used to stuff pillows, comforters and soft animals because of its soft and springy texture. It is also machine-washable and does not clump easily when wet.
  • Polygiene® is a high-performance, fabric enhancement technology designed to battle odor-causing bacteria and fungi. Rather than relying on chemical treatments, Polygiene® utilizes naturally antimicrobial recycled silver. Unlike some antimicrobial products, the odor-resistance of Polygiene® is designed to last for the life of the garment.
  • A polymer is a chemical compound or mixture of compounds used as a base, coating or fabric because of its durability. Examples of polymers that have been in use for centuries include shellac, amber and natural rubber. A natural polymer found as the main constituent of wood and paper is cellulose.
  • Sometimes referred to as Modal, polynosic is a form of rayon spun into fine count/denier yarn. Polynosic fabrics have the luster of silk and a dry tactile feeling. It has high wet strength, is washable and may be blended with other fibers such as polyester and cotton.
  • Polypropylene is a polymer fiber that does not absorb moisture but will wick moisture from the skin. Polypropylene is often used in both warm-weather and cold-weather performance base layers. It is used by wearers primarily for non-aerobic activities such as heavy weight lifting or sprinting.
  • Polyurethane is a resin-based substance used as coatings, fibers and in articles such as the wheels on luggage. As a heavy, waterproof and non-breathable coating, polyurethane’s common uses are in tents and packs. In lighter, microporous and breathable forms, it is used to coat outerwear.
  • The butt or end of a knife, opposite the point. The pommel is typically found at the bottom of a knife handle, and may include a lanyard hole. The pommel may also be part of the metal tang, which may or may not protrude out from the bottom of the handle.
  • Pongee is a lightweight, plain-weave, thin fabric woven from silk or imitation silk. Originating in China Pongee fabric is often used in summer suits and sportswear. It is said to be an altered English form of the Chinese words: punchi, meaning “home-woven”, or pun-shi, meaning “native or wild silk”.
  • Pontella® is a type of polyester fabric with superior wicking properties, to the extent that even when wet it does not stick to the skin – thus eliminating the feel of coldness. Pontella® also dries faster than cotton; it takes 17 minutes for Pontella® to dry versus 37 minutes for cotton to dry.
  • Poplin is a plain, tightly woven fabric with a fine warp and heavier weft, creating a pronounced rib. Originally created with a silk warp and a worsted weft, poplin fabric now blends polyester with cotton for easy care. Poplin possesses a generally heavier texture and hand than that of broadcloth.
  • Porelle® is a microporous, windproof and waterproof breathable membrane used with woven fabrics and footwear. Porelle® technology is most commonly used with cycling socks and gloves because of its ability to shed moisture and keep the wearer warm and comfortable without overheating.
  • A type of prism used in some binoculars and scopes. A Porro prism is a right geometric prism used to change the orientation of an optical image. In binoculars, two Porro prisms are combined (a.k.a double Porro prism), with the second prism offset by 90 degrees. This configuration re-orients an image that would otherwise be inverted by the optics. Porro prism binoculars tend to be larger and bulkier than roof prism binoculars, but may also provide better light transmission for a brighter image.
  • A powder skirt is attached to the linings of some winter jackets and parkas to keep snow out of the coat. A powder skirt is a water-repellent skirt with an elastic gripper bottom. When zipped or snapped closed it keeps snow and wind from sneaking up into the jacket and keeps warmth in.
  • Polartec® Power Dry® is usually used as a base layer. The fabric has a bit of stretch and extra moisture-wicking power for more comfort next to the skin. Polartec® Power Dry® uses different yarns on either side of the fabric, one made to move moisture away from the skin and the other to dry quickly.
  • Polartec® Power Shield® encompasses an entire family of durable fabrics with a wind- and water-resistant nylon face, inner insulation and a membrane between the two to block wind and allow body moisture to escape. Polartec® Power Shield® is often used in outdoor and cold-weather gear because of its ability to keep the wearer warm and dry.
  • Polartec® Power Stretch® is a base layer fabric with wicking comparable to Polartec® Power Dry® but with more supportive, compression stretch. Polartec® Power Stretch® is especially appropriate for aerobic exercise because the amount of stretch allows the wearer to move their body without their clothing restricting them.
  • PreCip® is a proprietary polyurethane coating technology specially engineered for unlined garments. PreCip® combines hydrophobic and hydrophilic polyurethane with a special Dry Touch Technology silk protein in a precisely controlled two-layer coating system. It is specially formulated for durability and breathability with Dry Touch next to the skin to reduce condensation and the sticky clammy feel of most coatings. Precip Plus® features increased breathability.
  • PrimaLoft® is a microfibrous polyester insulation so fine that in equal weights and densities it is as warm as down and warmer than other synthetics. In wet conditions PrimaLoft® remains lighter and surpasses any other synthetic or natural insulation. The insulation is often used in outdoor and cold-weather gear as well as pillows and comforters.
  • Similar to Glen Plaid (short for Glen Urquhart plaid, the Prince of Wales check is a pattern of checks with repeating sequence that renders the checks larger. The Prince of Wales check is often confused with a style favored by Edward, Duke of Windsor, when he became Prince of Wales. His was a black and white Glen Urquhart check. The pattern was actually made for Edward VII when he was Prince of Wales.
  • Princess seams are shaping seams, often used in place of darts, which curve away from the armholes and run down the front of a shirt or dress. Princess seams outline and flatter the female form and are used in jackets, coats, dresses and shirts.
  • A flat cloth that has been printed to resemble the wales of textured corduroy.
  • Printing is a process by which a pattern, often called a “print”, is laid onto a textile. There are several different ways to print a textile, such as using stencils, engraved plates, wooden blocks, rollers or silkscreens. All of these methods are called direct methods of printing, which means each type directly places dyes and thickeners onto the fabric.
  • Proposition 65 entitles California consumers to special warnings for products that contain chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm if those products expose consumers to such chemicals above certain threshold levels. Sierra Trading Post takes product safety seriously and we comply with Proposition 65 requirements. As a responsible closeouts company, we do our very best to recognize and label items our vendors have deemed applicable to Prop. 65.
  • PVC (polyvinyl chloride) is a widely-used plastic material used in coatings to provide waterproofness and for a myriad of other applications, such as plumbing, furniture, fencing, pet houses, accessories and even football goalposts. PVC most often brings to mind white piping, but other uses of the material are employed every day.
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