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  • Sanitized® is a protective finish technology that provides antimicrobial, antibacterial and antifungal protection for textiles, plastics and leather. Materials coated in Sanitized® last longer because of the protective finish and are fresher because of the antimicrobial shield. Household textiles such as furniture, curtains and towels with Sanitized® coatings require less upkeep and less cleaning.
  • Reflec®, a Reflective Technologies product, uses sataLITE® technology to create a light-reflective fabric to be used on sporting apparel where visibility is a safety issue. sataLITE® is what each extremely small reflective bead in the Reflec® fabric is called. It is used in clothing to bounce light back to the source, thereby providing safety in dim light conditions.
  • Satin is a smooth fabric with a lustrous face and is generally used in neckwear, eveningwear, lingerie and luxury bedding. Satin threads are woven very close together, permitting as many of the warp ends as possible to float on the face of the fabric where they catch the light and produce satin’s characteristic sheen. Satin can be made from polyester, acetate, nylon or rayon.
  • Scent-Lok® is a scent-eliminating technology that adsorbs and retains human odors in microscopic pores, cracks and crevices in activated carbon. Scent-Lok® is used primarily in hunting clothing that breathes for comfort. Scent-Lok® apparel can be washed and reactivated by placing in a clothes dryer at intervals covered in the owner’s directions.
  • A Scherer Cinch is a pulley-like system that doubles the tightening force when used with waist belts in conjunction with (for example) backpacks and baby carriers. A Scherer Cinch provides an improved fit to waist belts because it does not require constant readjustment to stay in place.
  • A scoop pocket is a pocket with a U-shaped rounded edge. The scoop pocket is very popular in jeans, creating the “U” shape from the top seam to the side seam that is unique to jeans. The scoop pocket is also used in overcoats and even skirts. The curved opening allows the wearer to more easily slide their hands in and out of the pockets.
  • Scotchgard® is a spray or liquid that helps repel moisture and spills, block stains and resist soils, keeping fabrics and upholstery dry and clean. Scotchgard® is safe to use on dry-cleanable fabrics including silks and wools. It also has several varieties, including heavy-duty water repellent and mildew blockers.
  • Scotchlite® is a highly reflective material that can be incorporated into clothing, footwear and equipment to make the user more visible and safer in low-light conditions. Scotchlite® is often used on neon orange safety jackets to make the wearer more visible, whether the wearer is riding a bicycle, jogging, walking or riding a motorcycle in low light or at night.
  • Sea Island cotton is the rarest and most expensive of all cottons, known for its luster and strength. It feels silky because its dense weave is comprised of approximately 140 yarns per inch. Sea Island cotton was originally grown in the British Caribbean and is now grown in the Southeastern United States. It is available in only the highest-quality shirting.
  • Seersucker is a lightweight cloth with a texture that alternates between smooth and puckered stripes for a crinkled effect. Seersucker is durable and does not need ironing after laundering. It is a favorite fabric in warmer months because of its light weight and the crinkles that enable seersucker to float just above the skin.
  • The self-edge on a bolt of raw fabric is its reinforced outer edges, woven from special yarns that are sturdy enough to prevent the fabric from unraveling. The self-edge is sometimes incorporated into the construction of a garment in place of seam binding or other finishing techniques. Some firms mark their name or trademark at frequent intervals on the self-edge. Also known as “selvage”.
  • A self-loop is a tie loop made of the same fabric as the necktie, through which the small end of the tie is slid to hold it into place. The tie’s label is often used in the absence of a self-loop. Top-quality ties will reinforce their self-loops by securing them to the underside of the tie’s center back seam.
  • The selvage on a bolt of raw fabric is its reinforced outer edges, woven from special yarns that are sturdy enough to prevent the fabric from unraveling. The selvage is sometimes incorporated into the construction of a garment in place of seam binding or other finishing techniques. Some firms mark their name or trademark at frequent intervals on the self-edge. Also known as “self-edge”.
  • Serge is a diagonal-rib twill fabric that is sturdy and resilient. Made from wool and wool blends, serge can be produced in a variety of weights to accommodate different climates, making it ideal for use in uniforms. A popular choice for suiting material, serge has an excellent drape and is flexible enough to resist the wrinkling that can come with travel or all-day wear.
  • The seven-fold tie is the most elaborate and expensive necktie construction. The seven-fold tie is made from one piece of fabric carefully folded seven times, with no extraneous fabric or lining. It is a time-tested sign of quality craftsmanship because of the care and time necessary to make the tie.
  • Shark skin is leather made from the skin of sharks. Shark skin leather possesses a unique, raised grain; it is extremely durable and stronger than cowhide. Shark skin is considered an exotic leather due to its unique appearance and its relative scarcity.
  • Sharkskin is a smooth, worsted fabric, usually wool, that’s woven in a tiny, two-tone basket pattern with a step-like orientation that simulates the texture of real sharkskin. Sharkskin wool is ideal for business attire because of its flat drape and two-tone color that can be coordinated with accessories.
  • A shawl lapel or collar refers to the front opening of a garment that rolls back upon itself without peaks or notches. Shawl lapels are often seen on gentlemen’s formalwear such as tuxedos and dinner jackets. Rolling shawl collars are a popular construction technique for blouses, sweaters and bathrobes.
  • Shearling is natural wool fleece from sheep; specifically, lambskin or sheepskin that has been tanned with the wool still adhering to the skin. Shearling wool goes through a shearing process to make the wool a uniform thickness. Some mock or faux shearling consists of either real or synthetic wool sewn or glued to real or synthetic leather.
  • Shepherds check, also known as Shepherds plaid, is a pattern consisting of alternating black and white checks in quarter-inch repeats. Shepherds check originated from the Scottish Border District in the seventeenth century when it was woven into plaid clothing by shepherds in the lowlands. In 1851 at the Great Exhibition, the pattern created a commotion on the sartorial fashion scene and was subsequently embraced by manufacturers of men’s trousers.
  • A fleece lining material. Sherpa linings are typically made of high-pile polyester fleece. Sherpa fleece adds breathable warmth to hoodies, jackets and other apparel.
  • Shetland wool is wool from the Shetland Islands off the coast of Scotland. Prized for its lightness and warmth, Shetland wool resembles tweed but with a softer feel and slightly raised finish. Shetland wool gained popularity in the early 1900s when it was embraced by sportsmen, Ivy League gentlemen, and the upper class.
  • Shoc Pad is a footwear system that transfers the energy of impact from the heel throughout the footbed. Shoc Pad reduces fatigue and shock to the feet and joints, and can return greater spring with each forefoot push-off. It is often used in athletic activities.
  • Shock Air is a ventilating footwear technology that actively keeps the foot at natural, cooler temperatures, disperses damp air inside and improves the shoe’s ability to breathe. Shock Air is often used in athletic footwear to keep the wearer comfortable and dry while active.
  • Shock cord is tent cord technology engineered for mountaineering in cold temperatures. Shock cord uses the highest grade elastic as a core with a cotton inner to wick moisture and a highly durable, double-braided, nylon sheath for protection. The cord threads through hollow tent poles and keeps the poles together while the tent is being pitched.
  • A side seam pocket (or on-seam pocket) is a pocket that is incorporated into the construction of a side seam. Used in jackets, pants and skirts, the side seam pocket aligns itself with the side seam so that the pocket is very discreet and unobtrusive in its appearance.
  • A side vent is one of two vents incorporated into the back of a suit jacket for comfort when in a seated position. Side vents are constructed in such a way that the a man’s rear stays covered while reaching into the side pockets. Popularized in Italy, the side vent has achieved a certain amount of sartorial preference among modern dressers, though it is considered more difficult to tailor and fit properly.
  • Silent Rain® is an innovation in high-performance hunting apparel that is naturally water-repellent, non-pilling, burr-proof and totally silent. Silent Rain® ensures total weather protection by laminating a high-performance Omni-Tech® waterproof breathable film to the base fabric. As an added measure to keep water at bay, every seam is sealed with waterproof tape.
  • Single needle stitching is fabric sewn twice — once up and once down the garment’s seam, using only one needle and leaving just a single row of stitches visible from the outside. Single needle stitching will not pucker as double-needle seams can. Single needle stitching is a sign of a quality garment.
  • A single or center vent is the slit in the back of a suit jacket. Traditionally, the vent at the center rear of the suit jacket or sport coat was placed there so the wearer could more easily ride a horse with less clothing restriction and wrinkles. The single vent is a classic in men’s tailored clothing.
  • A sintered base on a ski is created by compressing, under heat, hundreds of thousands of tiny balls of base material. Because the material is not melted, the chemical composition of the base material remains unchanged. This results in a harder, more durable and porous base that allows wax to be easily absorbed. The increased porosity of a sintered base means it can be more work to get clean, but the payoff is in longer lasting wax jobs. Sintered bases are also much faster than traditional ski bases, which consist of melted polyethylene plastic that is poured into a mold.
  • A slash pocket is the term used to describe the angled front pocket on a pair of pants. Set into the side seam near the waistband, slash pockets can be diagonal or nearly vertical at their openings. Unlike a patch pocket, a slash pocket stows its item-carrying capacity on the inside of a garment, where it hangs freely.
  • A slip stitch is a method of sewing where only two or three threads are caught up by the needle, allowing maximum flex and recovery. Slip stitches are used on the backs of high-end neckties to foster elasticity and maintain the tie’s shape. Because slip stitches are designed to be invisible from the right side of a garment, they are also used on hand-stitched hems.
  • Slip-lasted shoes are usually lightweight athletic, casual shoes and slippers. In slip-lasted shoes, the upper is stitched to a sock, which serves as an insole. The last (the form over which the shoe is built) is then forced into the shoe so that an outsole can be attached. Major advantages to slip-lasted shoes are flexibility, the way the shoe molds to the foot and cost.
  • Smart Fabric Technology® is used in fabrics such as Outlast® that absorb, store and release heat or cold based on the individual’s body temperature or an outside source (for example, by being warmed by a heater or cooled in a refrigerator). Used by itself and/or in combination with other fabric technologies, Smart Fabric Technology® helps to create clothing that adapts to the body.
  • SolarMax® is made of nylon and has superior ultraviolet resistance and durability for use in outdoor fabric applications. SolarMax® is ideal for use in life jackets, tents, sun shades and similar products. It is also used in fabrics for outdoor activities such as hot air balloons, parachutes and paragliders.
  • A renewable resource and a byproduct of the food industry, some soy fibers are organic, but others are not. While organic soy fibers are greener than those from traditionally grown soybeans, all soy fibers are better for the environment than most fabrics. Soft and smooth with a silky luster, soy is the new “it” fiber of the sustainable clothing industry.
  • Spandura® is an unusually tough fabric with extensible properties often used in high-quality luggage and outdoor gear to provide resistance to tears and abrasion. Each yarn consists of Cordura® fibers spun around a Lycra® core. The resulting Spandura® fabric feels soft, supple and stretchy, with excellent strength and tear resistance.
  • Spectra® is a linearized, ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene material used in backpacks, ropes, fishing line and many other items. Pound for pound, Spectra® is ten times stronger than steel and five times stronger than Kevlar®. It can be used in products by itself or can be woven with nylon to soften the material.
  • Spectral Control® is a sunglass technology employing patented filters that interact with the full spectrum of light, selectively blocking and filtering each wavelength. Spectral Control® improves contrast so objects appear more sharply defined and colors are bright and vibrant. Glare is virtually eliminated, allowing the eyes to relax and see everything more clearly.
  • A split raglan shoulder is a construction technique often used in overcoats or dress coats. The split raglan shoulder has a traditional set-in sleeve in the front of the coat and raglan-sleeve construction in the rear. The split raglan shoulder offers a cleaner look and more comfortable fit than straightforward set-in sleeves.
  • A split yoke is a style of shirt construction where the back yoke consists of two pieces of fabric stitched together. A split yoke can create a dynamic effect when stripes are set at an angle and meet in the middle. Split-yoke construction creates a more attractive fit at the shoulder. Because it is considered more difficult to produce, it is usually found only on higher-quality shirts.
  • A spread collar is a collar whose points are more spread than a straight-point collar but are less open than a cutaway collar. A spread collar is generally considered more dressy than the straight-point collar. The wide points of the spread collar can easily accommodate a large necktie knot.
  • Stability Web® is an athletic and outdoor footwear technology that provides lightweight, stable support for the midfoot. Stability Web® is made of thermoplastic urethane and allows for torsion and flexion control in the arch while maintaining flexibility in the forefoot. It offers the wearer comfort and the support necessary for athletic activities.
  • Stitchout (or stitchdown) construction is a construction method in footwear. In stitchout construction, the upper is flanged out over the top of the outsole and the outsole is fastened to the upper by stitching through it. This type of construction provides additional comfort and flexibility to the wearer.
  • Strobel construction is a method of shoe and boot construction in which the insole is stitched to the upper along its perimeter, providing excellent stability and flexibility. Strobel shoe construction is different from regular shoe construction in which the upper and the insole are glued together. Strobel comes from a German shoe-making term concerning the stitching of a shoe.
  • Suede leather is made from the under side of the lambskin, goatskin, pigskin, calfskin or deerskin. Suede is thinner than full-grain leather and is desired for its softness and pliability, which makes it suitable for jackets and gloves. Unlike nubuck, which is top-grain leather that’s been brushed and polished, suede is buffed to a soft, velvety hand and is not nearly as strong as full-grain leather.
  • Supima® cotton is grown and trademarked by the Supima Association of America. Supima stands for Superior Pima cotton, which is grown in the USA. The cotton has a 30% longer staple fiber than regular cottons, increasing its softness and luster. Supima® cotton is made from strong fibers that have an affinity for color dye.
  • Supplex® is a nylon fabric engineered to provide the soft, supple touch of cotton with the strength, durability and performance advantages of nylon. Supplex® is flexible, lightweight and softer than standard nylon fabrics and does not shrink, wrinkle or fade. It resists abrasions, punctures and tears and is fast-drying, breathable and odor, wind and water resistant.
  • Supplex® Taslite is a lightweight and durable two-layer Gore-Tex® material made of 100% nylon laminated to a waterproof breathable Gore-Tex® membrane. The additional layer adds durability on areas of high wear. Supplex® Taslite gives the wearer protection from water while still allowing perspiration to evaporate out of the membrane.
  • Supprescent® is a type of Windstopper® technology using activated carbon to conceal human scent. Supprescent® is engineered to meet the needs of demanding hunters. It is specifically designed for close-range big game hunting, when scent control and silence are critical, but durable wind-resistance and breathability cannot be compromised. Supprescent® uses only soft textiles with no adhesives or stiffeners, so it is not only durably windproof and scent proof, it also will help minimize sound that is generated as a hunter moves.
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