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Item #5530H

Extrasport Volks Jr. PFD Life Jacket - USCG Approved (For Youth)

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Information about Extrasport Volks Jr. PFD Life Jacket - USCG Approved (For Youth)
Closeouts. Extrasport's Volks Jr. life jacket features a deep-cut neckline, wide-open armholes and an easy-to-wear full-zip front that's perfect for just about any watersport.
  • Low-profile design with a deep-cut neckline and wide armholes for better mobility
  • Adjustable side straps
  • Easy-to-wear full-zip front
  • Elasticized waist
  • PVC-free Gaia® foam
  • 3M® Scotchlite reflective strips on chest
  • Length: 14"
  • Made in China
Specs about Extrasport Volks Jr. PFD Life Jacket - USCG Approved (For Youth)
  • USCG classification: Type III
  • Design flotation: 11 lb. 8 oz.
  • Entry: Front
  • PFD Style: Paddling
  • Gender: Kids
  • Length: 14"
  • Weight: 1 lb.
  • Material: 200 denier nylon, PVC-free foam
  • Made in China

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Most Helpful 4-Star Review

Reviewed by Tracy from Arizona on Tuesday, September 17, 2013
I bought this for my eleven year old daughter for kayaking. She weighs 73 pounds and this fits her well with a little room to grow. It is rated for up to 90 pounds.
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  • Reviewed by Tracy from Arizona on Tuesday, September 17, 2013
    I bought this for my eleven year old daughter for kayaking. She weighs 73 pounds and this fits her well with a little room to grow. It is rated for up to 90 pounds.
  • Reviewed by Canoe Mom from Northern New York on Monday, July 15, 2013
    This was a hit with my 10-year-old girl. She tried it on and immediately said that it was very comfortable. She's about 4 feet and around 60 pounds - so pretty slim and it fit close even without having to tighten the side straps (which we will need to do before hitting the water). There was plenty of expansion room, it was just tailored to fit well even for the small end of the size range.

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  • 1-4 of 4 questions
    • Answer I would not recommend this for a five year old. What it is recommended for is a Youth (50-90 lbs, chest size: 25"-29").
      Answered on 4/11/2013 2:09:45 PM by Product Specialist Marv from Sierra Trading Post
  • Question “what size (weight) person does this fit?”
    Asked on 2/16/2013 12:00:00 AM by MontanaGal from Bigfork, Montana
    • Answer Actually PFD's do have weight range. They have a Design Floatation, this PFD has a 11 lb. 8 oz. rating. This is a link to USCG information page about PFD's. http://www.uscg.mil/hq/cg5/cg5214/pfdselection.asp Buoyancy - The tendancy of a body to float or sink in water or any other fluid. Most people will naturally float in water, especially if they fill their lungs with air. Most require only about 11 pounds (50 Newtons) of extra buoyancy to keep their head out of water. That is why a PFD with just 15.5 pounds (70 Newtons) of buoyancy can provide adequate flotation for an adult -- even a very large person. PFDs with 22 to 34 pounds (100 to 155 Newtons) can provide superior performance. In technical terms, buoyancy is determined by Archimedes' Principle: Any body partially or completely submerged in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body. That means someone immersed in water is "buoyed" upward by a force equal to the weight of the volume of water that their body takes up (displaces). Gravity pulls a person's body downward by a force equal to their weight. The difference between these forces is a person's net buoyancy. A PFD is very light weight, but displaces enough water to make the PFD and the person wearing it very buoyant. It also follows that the people hardest to float are those with compact, dense bodies. These tend to be people with athletic body builds, with a lot of bone and muscle mass, and not much fat. Fat is not as dense as muscle and bone, so people who are overweight can actually be easier to float than someone who is much smaller and leaner. Heavy people do not need a higher buoyancy PFD because of their weight.
      Answered on 2/26/2013 12:00:00 AM by Prod Spec Kevin from Sierra Trading Post
    • Answer what size does this fit?
      Answered on 6/23/2013 9:06:22 PM by Allan Gully from Minnesota
  • Question “What weight and size person is this rated for?”
    Asked on 2/14/2013 12:00:00 AM by Nicki from Dillon, CI
    • Answer Actually PFD's do have weight range. They have a Design Floatation, this PFD has a 11 lb. 8 oz. rating. This is a link to USCG information page about PFD's. http://www.uscg.mil/hq/cg5/cg5214/pfdselection.asp|Buoyancy - The tendancy of a body to float or sink in water or any other fluid. Most people will naturally float in water, especially if they fill their lungs with air. Most require only about 11 pounds (50 Newtons) of extra buoyancy to keep their head out of water. That is why a PFD with just 15.5 pounds (70 Newtons) of buoyancy can provide adequate flotation for an adult -- even a very large person. PFDs with 22 to 34 pounds (100 to 155 Newtons) can provide superior performance.||In technical terms, buoyancy is determined by Archimedes' Principle:|Any body partially or completely submerged in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body.||That means someone immersed in water is "buoyed" upward by a force equal to the weight of the volume of water that their body takes up (displaces). Gravity pulls a person's body downward by a force equal to their weight. The difference between these forces is a person's net buoyancy. A PFD is very light weight, but displaces enough water to make the PFD and the person wearing it very buoyant.||It also follows that the people hardest to float are those with compact, dense bodies. These tend to be people with athletic body builds, with a lot of bone and muscle mass, and not much fat. Fat is not as dense as muscle and bone, so people who are overweight can actually be easier to float than someone who is much smaller and leaner. Heavy people do not need a higher buoyancy PFD because of their weight.
      Answered on 2/15/2013 12:00:00 AM by Prod Spec Kevin from Sierra Trading Post
    • Answer They do not have thumb holes.
      Answered on 2/15/2013 12:00:00 AM by Prod Spec Kevin from Sierra Trading Post
  • Question “What is the weight range for this life jacket?”
    Asked on 2/14/2013 12:00:00 AM by water safe mom from Unknown
    • Answer Actually PFD's do have weight range. They have a Design Floatation, this PFD has a 11 lb. 8 oz. rating. This is a link to USCG information page about PFD's. http://www.uscg.mil/hq/cg5/cg5214/pfdselection.asp|Buoyancy - The tendancy of a body to float or sink in water or any other fluid. Most people will naturally float in water, especially if they fill their lungs with air. Most require only about 11 pounds (50 Newtons) of extra buoyancy to keep their head out of water. That is why a PFD with just 15.5 pounds (70 Newtons) of buoyancy can provide adequate flotation for an adult -- even a very large person. PFDs with 22 to 34 pounds (100 to 155 Newtons) can provide superior performance.||In technical terms, buoyancy is determined by Archimedes' Principle:|Any body partially or completely submerged in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body.||That means someone immersed in water is "buoyed" upward by a force equal to the weight of the volume of water that their body takes up (displaces). Gravity pulls a person's body downward by a force equal to their weight. The difference between these forces is a person's net buoyancy. A PFD is very light weight, but displaces enough water to make the PFD and the person wearing it very buoyant.||It also follows that the people hardest to float are those with compact, dense bodies. These tend to be people with athletic body builds, with a lot of bone and muscle mass, and not much fat. Fat is not as dense as muscle and bone, so people who are overweight can actually be easier to float than someone who is much smaller and leaner. Heavy people do not need a higher buoyancy PFD because of their weight.
      Answered on 2/15/2013 12:00:00 AM by Prod Spec Kevin from Sierra Trading Post
    • Answer Actually PFD's do have weight range. They have a Design Floatation, this PFD has a 11 lb. 8 oz. rating. This is a link to USCG information page about PFD's. http://www.uscg.mil/hq/cg5/cg5214/pfdselection.asp|Buoyancy - The tendancy of a body to float or sink in water or any other fluid. Most people will naturally float in water, especially if they fill their lungs with air. Most require only about 11 pounds (50 Newtons) of extra buoyancy to keep their head out of water. That is why a PFD with just 15.5 pounds (70 Newtons) of buoyancy can provide adequate flotation for an adult -- even a very large person. PFDs with 22 to 34 pounds (100 to 155 Newtons) can provide superior performance.||In technical terms, buoyancy is determined by Archimedes' Principle:|Any body partially or completely submerged in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body.||That means someone immersed in water is "buoyed" upward by a force equal to the weight of the volume of water that their body takes up (displaces). Gravity pulls a person's body downward by a force equal to their weight. The difference between these forces is a person's net buoyancy. A PFD is very light weight, but displaces enough water to make the PFD and the person wearing it very buoyant.||It also follows that the people hardest to float are those with compact, dense bodies. These tend to be people with athletic body builds, with a lot of bone and muscle mass, and not much fat. Fat is not as dense as muscle and bone, so people who are overweight can actually be easier to float than someone who is much smaller and leaner. Heavy people do not need a higher buoyancy PFD because of their weight.
      Answered on 2/15/2013 12:00:00 AM by Prod Spec Kevin from Sierra Trading Post