After around 5 years of use

Reviewed by Tommy from Colorado on Friday, February 19, 2016
My Atlas 1030 snowshoes are older, but are largely the same as today's 1030s. Mine have neither the toe locator nor the climbing bar. But the bindings, decking, tubing shape and material, and crampon layout and makeup are largely the same. I weigh about 190 lbs and shoe with either a CamelBak or a pack with camera gear weighing up to 45 lbs. I usually wear Lowa Tibet GTX boots with these snowshoes, though I sometime will go with Lowa Renegade GTX boots in warmer winter weather. These snowshoes have taken me into the steeper back country of Rocky Mountain National Park as well as the more rolling terrain of Pike National Forest and vicinity. They float very well in deeper powdery conditions, but they also grip well in icier conditions where I'm traversing terrain or walking up or down steep areas. After 5 years, the shoes are still proving very durable, with the rivets still holding solidly with no pullout and no signs of wearing through at any of the points where decking wraps around the frame. The underside does have plenty of abrasion, but it is cosmetic with no threat to function. I love the Wrapp bindings. Entry and securing is quick and easy, even in gloved hands. And they hold securely and comfortably. And when I return at the trailhead all worn out, releasing the bindings is a quick and easy process, though I have to take my gloves off to get it done. I have two very minor gripes. First, the way the pivot works in deeper snow, the shoes fling snow on the backs of my legs. Second, because the bindings are so bulky, I've had to get creative when attaching the shoes to my pack for lowland walking or when packing them for travel. But overall, I cannot imagine a better snowshoe. When the day comes that I've worn these out, I'll be getting another pair of the same.